Health $ Lifestyle

Linseed for breakfast and no lunch – how the King stays fit to stand him in the best possible stead for his cancer fight

King Charles is known for his love of the outdoors and often breakfasts on fibre-rich Linseed on fruit.

And this healthy lifestyle will help stand the monarch in the best possible stead for his cancer fight.

Alongside healthy breakfasts, the King has said he regularly abstains from eating meat, fish and dairy on certain days of the week.

As a devotee of fresh produce, he even launched his own food brand, Duchy Originals, in 1990, which is now run as Waitrose Duchy Organic.

Meanwhile, a list of facts about Charles on the Royal Family website confirms that, due to his hectic schedule, he ‘does not eat lunch’.

The King's healthy lifestyle will help stand the monarch in the best possible stead for his cancer fight. Pictured, the King during a vist to Malton, North Yorkshire

The King’s healthy lifestyle will help stand the monarch in the best possible stead for his cancer fight. Pictured, the King during a vist to Malton, North Yorkshire

Alongside healthy breakfasts, the King has said he regularly abstains from eating meat, fish and dairy on certain days of the week. (Stock image of flaxseed)

Alongside healthy breakfasts, the King has said he regularly abstains from eating meat, fish and dairy on certain days of the week. (Stock image of flaxseed)

His former press secretary Julian Payne also said: ‘The King doesn’t eat lunch; so, an early lesson I learnt when out on the road with him was to have a big breakfast or bring a few snack bars with you to keep you going.

‘The working day is pretty relentless. Beginning with the radio news headlines and a breakfast of seasonal fruit salad and seeds with tea.’

In fact, his only break from his relentless schedule is taken at around 1pm ‘not to eat but to get outside to walk.

‘The King dislikes being inside for too long and always has the windows wide open,’ Mr Payne said.

This love of the outdoors – including hiking and camping – is thought to have been fostered during his time at Gordonstoun School.

This has never diminished with Bear Grylls describing him as ‘an adventurer at heart’ and a ‘champion of the outdoors’ his entire life.

Experts agree that maintaining a healthy lifestyle is both important in the prevention of cancer and during cancer treatment.

In fact, his only break from his relentless schedule is taken at around 1pm 'not to eat but to get outside to walk. King Charles attends a hedge-laying event at Highgrove Estate, Gloucestershire

In fact, his only break from his relentless schedule is taken at around 1pm ‘not to eat but to get outside to walk. King Charles attends a hedge-laying event at Highgrove Estate, Gloucestershire

King Charles III and Queen Camilla attend the Sunday Holy Communion service at St. Mary Magdalene church in Sandringham, Norfolk on February 4

King Charles III and Queen Camilla attend the Sunday Holy Communion service at St. Mary Magdalene church in Sandringham, Norfolk on February 4

Evidence shows it can help manage the stress and fatigue caused by cancer and its treatment, with the only exceptions being certain cancers, such as those of the bone.

Studies have also found people who get exercise during treatment not only deal better with side effects but also may live longer.

International guidelines recommend patients stay active and get back to their normal activities as soon as possible.

With a reputation as fit and healthy for his age of 75, Charles has kept active with hill-walking and gardening.

He has seldom required hospital treatment, aside from relatively minor ailments, his recent prostate enlargement treatment and accidents from his active lifestyle, such as polo and skiing.

Indeed, numerous falls during his many years playing polo are thought to be responsible for back pain that has troubled him for decades.

A tartan cushion is often a companion on Royal tours, while a red velvet equivalent is apparently always placed on the King’s chair during state banquets at Buckingham Palace.

During an engagement at a Sikh temple in Southall, west London, in 2003, he told the congregation that he would need a little care as he sat on the hard floor.

Numerous falls during his many years playing polo are thought to be responsible for back pain that has troubled him for decades

Numerous falls during his many years playing polo are thought to be responsible for back pain that has troubled him for decades

An advocate of alternative and complementary medicines, including homoeopathy, Charles was even a patron of the regulatory body the General Osteopathic Council

An advocate of alternative and complementary medicines, including homoeopathy, Charles was even a patron of the regulatory body the General Osteopathic Council

‘I don’t think I have ever needed an osteopath so much as I have today,’ he said ‘My back is not altogether geared to sitting on the floor, so I may need some help on my way out.’

That same year, he underwent a hernia operation at the private King Edward VII’s Hospital in London, the hospital favoured by the royal family.

In typical fashion, he took it in his stride, even joking ‘hernia today, gone tomorrow’ to waiting media after being discharged the next day.

Five years later in 2008, he underwent a minor, routine procedure to have a non-cancerous growth removed from the bridge of his nose.

More recently, in March 2020, it was reported that the then Prince Charles had tested positive for Covid-19 but only had mild symptoms.

Isolating at Birkhall, Aberdeenshire, away from the then-Duchess of Cornwall who tested negative, he carried on working at his desk.

The King reported losing his sense of taste and smell for a time and later spoke of the ‘strange, frustrating and often distressing’ experience of being without friends and relatives during lockdown.

He caught Covid for a second time in February 2022, but by this time had been triple-vaccinated.

An advocate of alternative and complementary medicines, including homoeopathy, Charles was even a patron of the regulatory body the General Osteopathic Council.

This has seen him urge health ministers to adopt a more holistic approach to tackling health problems – an approach he is likely to take himself now alongside what has been described as a ‘schedule of regular treatments’.

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