Health $ Lifestyle

Prince Harry sparks warning over his ‘irresponsible’ ayahuasca promotion

How dangerous Amazonian drug ‘promoted’ by Prince Harry has become the latest trend adored by middle class Brits

  • Amazonian tribes use the psychedelic ayahuasca for ‘spiritual enlightenment’ 
  • Prince Harry discussed the role of the hallucinogenic in managing his ‘trauma’

With Prince Harry discussing the role of drugs in managing his ‘trauma and pain’, a spotlight has once again been shone onto ayahuasca.

Amazonian tribes have used the psychedelic brew for thousands of years to bring ‘spiritual enlightenment’.

Yet ayahuasca’s use isn’t just confined to shamanistic rituals deep in the jungles of Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador — or young Western travellers experimenting while they journey through South America.

For the powerful hallucinogenic potion has, over the past decade, become trendy among another group… to the despair of psychiatrists and experts.

Ayahuasca triggered feelings of 'release' and 'comfort' that helped him deal with his trauma, Prince Harry said. He added: 'It was the cleaning of the windscreen, cleaning of the windshield, the removal of life's filters just as much as on Instagram, these layers of filters. 'It removed it all for me and brought me a sense of relaxation, release, comfort, a lightness that I managed to hold on to for a period of time. 'I started doing it recreationally and then started to realise how good it was for me, I would say it is one of the fundamental parts of my life that changed me and helped me deal with the traumas and pains of the past'

Ayahuasca triggered feelings of ‘release’ and ‘comfort’ that helped him deal with his trauma, Prince Harry said. He added: ‘It was the cleaning of the windscreen, cleaning of the windshield, the removal of life’s filters just as much as on Instagram, these layers of filters. ‘It removed it all for me and brought me a sense of relaxation, release, comfort, a lightness that I managed to hold on to for a period of time. ‘I started doing it recreationally and then started to realise how good it was for me, I would say it is one of the fundamental parts of my life that changed me and helped me deal with the traumas and pains of the past’

In the interview broadcast online on Friday, Prince Harry talked to Dr Gabor Maté (pictured), a controversial author and trauma expert who is an advocate of decriminalising drugs. The Hungarian-Canadian doctor has used ayahuasca to treat his patients suffering from mental illness. In the interview, which viewers were charged £19 to watch ¿ and get a copy of his book ¿ Prince Harry discussed the rift with his family and his experience with drugs

 In the interview broadcast online on Friday, Prince Harry talked to Dr Gabor Maté (pictured), a controversial author and trauma expert who is an advocate of decriminalising drugs. The Hungarian-Canadian doctor has used ayahuasca to treat his patients suffering from mental illness. In the interview, which viewers were charged £19 to watch — and get a copy of his book — Prince Harry discussed the rift with his family and his experience with drugs

Presenter Bruce Parry, famous for making documentaries in remote parts of the world, has been partly credited with ‘bringing ayahuasca to the middle classes’.

After taking it with indigenous tribes in Iquitos, Peru, he called the bitter brew one of his ‘greatest healing methodologies’ when discussing its effects in 2013. 

In a frank admission, Bruce said he takes it ‘as often as possible’ in Colombia and other parts of the world.

No data exists to prove how commonly the drink is used in the UK.

Yet there are dozens of events and retreats, which cost up to £1,500 for a week, in the UK that have been shared online under the hashtag ayahuasca, or promising ayahuasca ceremonies.

Ayahuasca has been blamed for the deaths of at least three Brits, one of whom took her own life due to its effect on her mental health.

DMT is the active ingredient in ayahuasca, which makes it a Class A Drug. 

Possession can come with a prison term of up to seven years in the UK and an unlimited fine.

It is made by combining the bark from a Banisteriopsis caapi vine tree and leaves from the Psychotria viridis bush — both of which are native to south America — and originally used by shamans for healing and religious rituals.

The psychedelic affects all the senses — altering a person’s thinking, sense of time and emotions. It can make users feel tripped out, hallucinate or feel frightened and confused.

Its effects, which are almost instantaneous and said to be similar to LSD and magic mushrooms, also include raised blood pressure, heart rate and body temperature, as well as nausea, diarrhoea and anxiety.

Experts are now worried that Prince Harry’s latest comments could ‘promote’ the ‘quack therapy’, which is illegal in the UK, US and Canada, as a way to ‘remove life’s filters’. 

In an interview broadcast online on Friday, Prince Harry talked to Dr Gabor Maté, a controversial author and trauma expert who is an advocate of decriminalising drugs. 

The Hungarian-Canadian doctor has used ayahuasca to treat his patients suffering from mental illness.

In the interview, which viewers were charged £19 to watch — and get a copy of his book — Prince Harry discussed the rift with his family and his experience with drugs. 

He said that cocaine ‘didn’t do anything’ for him, though it was a ‘social thing’ and gave him a ‘sense of belonging’.

But marijuana ‘really’ helped him. 

And ayahuasca triggered feelings of ‘release’ and ‘comfort’ that helped him deal with his trauma, Prince Harry said.

He added: ‘It was the cleaning of the windscreen, cleaning of the windshield, the removal of life’s filters just as much as on Instagram, these layers of filters.

‘It removed it all for me and brought me a sense of relaxation, release, comfort, a lightness that I managed to hold on to for a period of time.

Presenter Bruce Parry (pictured), famous for making documentaries in remote parts of the world, has been partly credited with 'bringing ayahuasca to the middle classes'. After taking it with indigenous tribes in Iquitos, Peru, he called the bitter brew one of his 'greatest healing methodologies' when discussing its effects in 2013

Presenter Bruce Parry (pictured), famous for making documentaries in remote parts of the world, has been partly credited with ‘bringing ayahuasca to the middle classes’. After taking it with indigenous tribes in Iquitos, Peru, he called the bitter brew one of his ‘greatest healing methodologies’ when discussing its effects in 2013

While there is no data on how commonly the brown-reddish brewed drink (pictured) is used in the UK. But it is thought to be popular among the middle classes

While there is no data on how commonly the brown-reddish brewed drink (pictured) is used in the UK. But it is thought to be popular among the middle classes

Ayahuasca is made by combining the bark from a Banisteriopsis caapi vine tree and leaves from the Psychotria viridis bush ¿ both of which are native to south America ¿ and originally used by shamans for healing and religious rituals

Ayahuasca is made by combining the bark from a Banisteriopsis caapi vine tree and leaves from the Psychotria viridis bush — both of which are native to south America — and originally used by shamans for healing and religious rituals

‘I started doing it recreationally and then started to realise how good it was for me, I would say it is one of the fundamental parts of my life that changed me and helped me deal with the traumas and pains of the past.’

In a previous interview, Prince Harry said he would not recommended taking the substance recreationally. 

But he added: ‘Doing it with the right people if you are suffering from a huge amount of loss, grief or trauma, then these things have a way of working as a medicine.’ 

In the interview with the Duke of Sussex, Dr Maté denied that the drug can trigger side effects such as vomiting — which one study found affects seven in 10 users — and hallucinations.

He said: ‘You purge with it sometimes, it’s a good thing. It doesn’t give you hallucination — it gives you visions… You think it’s really happening.’

Traditional psychoactive plants that can trigger health problems 

For thousands of years before the arrival of European explorers, native American tribes harnessed the psychoactive properties of plants for magic and ritual.

Since the 1960s hippy trail reached South America, Western visitors have been tempted to ‘broaden their consciousness’ by consuming hallucinogenic drinks mixed by local shamen – traditional healers and spiritual guides.

While substances such as ayahuasca are illegal to possess or supply in the UK, overseas retreats where people can sample them are widely promoted online, and many users have reported trying them in this country as well.

Actress Lindsay Lohan credited drinking ayahuasca – which is created by pounding vine stems in boiling water – with helping to free her from ‘the wreckage of my past’.

Musician Sting is also a proponent, saying ayahuasca had convinced him a ‘higher intelligence’ was at work.

Users experience hours of illusions and flashbacks. It is illegal in the UK as it contains the Class A drug DMT.

Experts warn ayahuasca and similar potions could trigger underlying mental health conditions or heart problems.

There are reports that tourists in South America have been robbed after being drugged by bogus shamen.

After the death of backpacker Henry Miller, 19, from Bristol, who paid £13 to try ayahuasca during his gap year trip to Colombia in 2014, a coroner warned against taking part in such rituals.

Wachuma – brewed from the mescaline-producing San Pedro cactus and known as ‘the doorway’ – causes vomiting and 12-hour hallucinations, risking exacerbating underlying mental illness.

The cacti are legal to own – but only if not intended for human consumption.

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However, he added: ‘I don’t think it’s a panacea for dealing with trauma.’

Professor Edzard Ernst, emeritus professor of complementary medicine at the University of Exeter, told MailOnline: ‘Ayahuasca is an under-researched botanical hallucinogenic and psychedelic drug that has shown some rather preliminary promise in the treatment of depression, anxiety, and substance abuse.

‘Adverse effects are on record, some of which are serious. 

‘Its promotion as a life-changing treatment is unwise at best and irresponsible at worst.’

Dr Max Pemberton, an NHS psychiatrist in London and columnist for The Daily Mail, said the Duke of Sussex’s comments are ‘highly irresponsible and ‘promoting yet another quack therapy’.

‘Harry plainly has no understanding of the serious damage these substances can wreak on users – damage that I see on mental health hospital wards with upsetting frequency,’ he said. 

Dr Pemberton warned that Prince Harry has been ‘seduced by the fashionability of the drug, which is popular among the trendy middle classes’.

Meanwhile, the family of Jennifer Spencer, who died by suicide aged 29 in 2019 after taking ayahuasca in Peru, said his comments were ‘irresponsible’.

Ms Spencer suffered severe psychosis as a result of her experience with the drug. 

Her aunt, Fiona Chase, 73, told The Sun: ‘He should not be speaking positively about this drug. It’s irresponsible because a lot of people look up to him.

‘It worked for him, but it certainly didn’t work for Jenny. Like every drug, different people react differently.’

Ms Spencer is not the only Brit to die after a trip on ayahuasca, however.

Henry Miller, from Bristol, died in 2014, aged 19, in the Columbian rainforest, which he had travelled to be part of a shamanic ritual and take ayahuasca. 

On his first try, he felt no effects from the brew, so went back two days later to try it again. But soon after drinking one cup, his breathing slowed and he became unwell. 

His body was found by the side of a road, after two men tried to take him to hospital and ‘panicked’ when he died en route, an inquest heard at the time. A coroner ruled that it was an accidental death by intoxification.

Earlier this year, a coroner warned against taking the drug after Katie Hyatt, 32, suffered a mental breakdown and took her own life following a shamanic ritual at a retreat in Malvern, Worcestershire. 

Her parents believe she had consumed ayahuasca.

Last year, actor Will Smith revealed during an interview with Oprah Winfrey that he drank the brew over 12 times during a retreat in Peru, while having marital problems with his wife Jada.

Jennifer Spencer, 29, died by suicide after suffering from severe psychosis as a result of taking ayahuasca ¿ a Class A hallucinogenic drug

Jennifer Spencer, 29, died by suicide after suffering from severe psychosis as a result of taking ayahuasca – a Class A hallucinogenic drug 

Kate Hyatt, pictured, took her own life after taking part in shamanic healing ritual on a three-day retreat in Worcestershire

Kate Hyatt, pictured, took her own life after taking part in shamanic healing ritual on a three-day retreat in Worcestershire

Mike Tyson said ayahuasca and other psychedelics saved his life, while Hunter Biden said profound trips helped him become sober.

Actress Lindsay Lohan credited drinking ayahuasca – which is created by pounding vine stems in boiling water – with helping to free her from ‘the wreckage of my past’.

Musician Sting is also a proponent, saying ayahuasca had convinced him a ‘higher intelligence’ was at work.

And Aaron Rodgers, an American football quarterback for the Green Bay Packers, revealed that he took the drugs on two separate retreats to Peru, which he credited for helping with ‘a lot of healing’.

Experts warn that the ‘intense’ trips the drink can trigger may lead flashbacks or even a mental health condition.

It use dates back to 900BC, when it was taken for religious and medicinal purposes. While it continues to be used in this way in south America, the use by tourists has grown.

It is popular among tourists travelling in south America, who drink the brew during a ceremony, led by a healer or shaman, at specialist retreat centres.

Some studies have suggested ayahuasca could improve mental health and some credit it for tackling addiction, depression and trauma.

A University College London a study found the so-called ‘jungle tea’ may boost wellbeing and lower the risk of depression.

The UCL researchers, who examined results from the Global Drug Survey, said those who took the plant, which causes hallucinations that last up to six hours, were also less likely to develop eating disorders. 

If you are affected by any of the issues raised by this article, you can call the Samaritans anonymously for free on 116 123, or go online at samaritans.org

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